Category Archives: Entertainment

Radio Amica Cleveland Radio Podcast for Oct. 21, 2017

Join Tony Marotta of Radio Italia of Cleveland for this very special broadcast as he welcomes his dear friend and in-studio guest hostess Rita DiPasquale DiCello for a very delightful evening of fun as they will chat live with Italian recording artist Giovanni Costello on the occasion of the recent release of his new album “Splendido”.

For more information about Giovanni you can read the following music article from the February 2017 edition of “La Gazzetta Italiana”: http://www.lagazzettaitaliana.com/…/8306-giovanni-costello-…

Tune in of course for the usual two hours of the most “unusual” and “eclectic” Italian music you’ll ever hear, anywhere! Serie A soccer updates and local Italian community news and events!

TONIGHT’S PLAYLIST
Adriano Valle & Gabriella Piccinini
Marcella Bella
Tarantanova Sound
Negramaro
Giovanni Costello
Mango & Maria Giovanna Cherchi
Andrea Diletti
Riccardo Tesi & Banditaliana
Alexia
Vanessa Racci
Tony Sessolo
Marco Mengoni
Remo Anzovino
Claudio Villa
Padre Alfonso Maria Parente
Connie Francis
Zibba & Almalibre

Please follow and like us:

Radio Italia of Cleveland, Saturday Oct. 21 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm EST Time

Join Tony Marotta of Radio Italia of Cleveland from 6:00 to 8:00 PM (EST) on WRUW-FM 91.1 or www.wruw.org for this very special broadcast as he welcomes his dear friend and in-studio guest hostess Rita DiPasquale DiCello for a very delightful evening of fun as they will chat live with Italian recording artist Giovanni Costello on the occasion of the recent release of his new album “Splendido”.

For more information about Giovanni you can read the following music article from the February 2017 edition of “La Gazzetta Italiana”: http://www.lagazzettaitaliana.com/…/8306-giovanni-costello-…

Tune in of course for the usual two hours of the most “unusual” and “eclectic” Italian music you’ll ever hear, anywhere! Serie A soccer updates and local Italian community news and events!

TONIGHT’S PLAYLIST
Adriano Valle & Gabriella Piccinini
Marcella Bella
Tarantanova Sound
Negramaro
Giovanni Costello
Mango & Maria Giovanna Cherchi
Andrea Diletti
Riccardo Tesi & Banditaliana
Alexia
Vanessa Racci
Tony Sessolo
Marco Mengoni
Remo Anzovino
Claudio Villa
Padre Alfonso Maria Parente
Connie Francis
Zibba & Almalibre

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, closeup and text
Please follow and like us:

FRANKIE VALLIE & THE FOUR SEASONS COMING TO ST LOUIS NOVEMBER 30, 2017

frankievalli_spotlight.jpg

Click here for a seating chart.

Oh, what a story. Frankie Valli, who came to fame in 1962 as the lead singer of the Four Seasons, is hotter than ever in the 21st century. Thanks to the volcanic success of the Tony winning musical Jersey Boys, which chronicles the life and times of Frankie and his legendary group, such classic songs as “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Walk Like a Man,” “Rag Doll,” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You” are all the rage all over again. With the play in its twelfth blockbuster year on Broadway, and five other casts performing Jersey Boys nightly from Las Vegas to London, the real Frankie Valli is also packing venues around the world.

But please don’t say that Frankie is back. The truth is, he never went away. Sure, the majority of the 71 chart hits of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons (including 40 in the Top 40, 19 in the Top 10 and eight No. 1’s) came during the 1960s, but the music didn’t just disappear. He has toured almost continuously since 1962, and his songs have been omnipresent in such movies as The Deer HunterDirty DancingMrs. DoubtfireConspiracy Theory and The Wanderers. As many as 200 artists have done cover versions of Frankie’s “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You,” from Nancy Wilson’s jazz treatment to Lauryn Hill’s hip-hop makeover.

There’s something about Frankie’s music that makes young people of every generation want to get up and dance. Amid the disco era, the Seasons hit it big with “Who Loves You,” which reached No 3 in 1975, and “December 1963 (Oh, What a Night),” a No. 1 record in 1976.

But who could imagine that the first four decades would be only the beginning—that Frankie Valli would celebrate the new century with a new album and a heavy sold-out global concert schedule? No other pop star has ever received the kind of fresh lease on life that Jersey Boys has given Frankie Valli. In 2009 Jersey Boys made it into the Southern Hemisphere by having a wildly successful run in Melbourne, Australia, before moving to Sydney, Australia, and then New Zealand.

FRANKIE VALLIE & THE FOUR SEASONS

Thursday, November 30, 2017 at 8:00 pm

FAMILY ARENA – ST CHARLES

Accessible Seating

Please follow and like us:

PIZZA SHOP: AN ITALIAN-AMERICAN DREAM, Message from the Producer to St. Louis


Buy Your Tickets Now   for Sunday, Nov. 12 at 2:45 pm at
Plaza Frontenac Cinema in St Louis MO

A message from Laura Nespola, Producer

In our first screenings, audiences have told us that our protagonists, the Osso brothers, remind them of their own immigrant pasts, and of their grandparents’ and parents’ journeys. At a time when immigrants are facing renewed struggles, it’s gratifying to see a film like Pizza Shop celebrate people who have helped build the backbone of America.

Sincerely,
Laura Nespola
Producer, Pizza Shop: An Italian-American Dream

PIZZA SHOP introduces us to Charlie and Fred Osso, immigrant brothers from Calabria, Italy, who have run a wildly successful pizzeria and restaurant in a strip mall in northern New Jersey for nearly forty years.

Retirement is a dirty word to these workhorses: Charlie is serious and detail-oriented, with a short fuse and a soft center, while Fred is light-hearted and easy-going, a passionate chef and bon vivant. Growing up poor in post-war southern Italy, they could have never imagined how their lives would unfold, the challenges they’d face and the opportunities that awaited them.

Now in their seventies, they’re facing a forced relocation, construction of a new restaurant, their sons’ attempts to update the management style, and encroaching old age.

With humor, poignancy, and compassion, filmmaker Antony Osso (Charlie’s son) explores how a Mom-and-Pop Shop can be a vital hub for a community, the sacrifices parents make for their children, and what it means for immigrants when they fulfill the American dream.

Please follow and like us:

Ciao Italian Radio Program Today Sunday October 15th

We will be hosting the Italian Music Show  every Sunday, on WEW770 AM Radio in St. Louis

Listen from: 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm  CST from our streaming link below. We will play some popular Italian Music and interview some local personalities.  Hosted by Michael Santangelo “That’s Amore Dj” and Michael Cross. Please tell your friends about this new and exciting program.  Our show is streamed on the link directly below. If you miss the broadcast, it can also be found on the Ciao St Louis Podcast Site so you can listen anytime.

Please follow and like us:

Reinventing Southern Italian Folk Music and Dances

Buy this book

Cloth – $95.00
Paper – $25.00

Cover for Inserra: Global Tarantella: Reinventing Southern Italian Folk Music and Dances. Click for larger image

Global Tarantella

Reinventing Southern Italian Folk Music and Dances

How tarantella beguiled the world, and what happened next

Tarantella, a genre of southern Italian folk music and dance, is an international phenomenon–seen and heard in popular festivals, performed across the Italian diaspora, even adapted for New Age spiritual practices. The boom in popularity has diversified tarantella in practice while setting it within a host of new, unexpected contexts.

Incoronata Inserra ventures into the history, global circulation, and recontextualization of this fascinating genre. Examining tarantella’s changing image and role among Italians and Italian Americans, Inserra illuminates how factors like tourism, translation, and world music venues have shifted the ethics of place embedded in the tarantella cultural tradition. Once rural, religious, and rooted, tarantella now thrives in settings urban, secular, migrant, and ethnic. Inserra reveals how the genre’s changing dynamics contribute to reimagining southern Italian identity. At the same time, they translate tarantella into a different kind of performance that serves new social and cultural groups and purposes. Indeed, as Inserra shows, tarantella’s global growth promotes a reassessment of gender relations in the Italian South and helps create space for Italian and Italian American women to reclaim gendered aspects of the genre.

“Gratifying to read. Makes a significant contribution–finally, in the English language, where few studies have been previously available–to the study of this rich, diverse, and globally relevant music phenomenon.”–Luisa Del Giudice, coauthor of Performing Ecstasies: Music, Dance, and Ritual in the Mediterranean

“Enhances our understanding of southern Italian music and dance while also refining our general models of folklore revival. The book shows how musicians graft their performances onto ever-shifting contexts of reception among mobile Italian and international audiences. It richly demonstrates that local perspectives on musical tradition are every bit as tricky as global ones.”–Dorothy Noyes, author of Humble Theory: Folklore’s Grasp on Social Life

Publication of this book was supported by grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the L. J. and Mary C. Skaggs Folklore Fund.


Incoronata Inserra is an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Please follow and like us:

Spotlight Italian Superhero Movie on Netfix: They Call Me Jeeg

They Call Me Jeeg (Italian: Lo chiamavano Jeeg Robot) is a 2015 Italian superhero film directed by Gabriele Mainetti (it) and starring Claudio Santamaria in the lead role. The plot concerns a lonely misanthropic crook named Enzo, who gets superhuman strength after being affected by radioactive waste in the Tiber waters.

The film is a tribute to the anime and manga series Steel Jeeg (Jeeg Robot in Italy, where it is widely popular) by Gō Nagai, from which takes up some thematics;[4] the title is an in-joke based on the Alessia character who believe that the hero of the anime, Hiroshi Shiba, exists in the real world, and she mistakes Enzo for him.[4] The title is also a reference to the spaghetti western film They Call Me Trinity.

It received largely positive critical reviews and was nominated for several film industry awards, including seventeen David di Donatello, winning eight. The film was also selected as the Italian entry for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film at the 89th Academy Awards but it was not nominated

As of July 2017, it is available on Netflix.

Link to movie

 

Please follow and like us:

Sogno Italiano: The Art Of The Dream In Italian Film

Sogno Italiano: The Art Of The Dream In Italian Film

Cinema Paradiso (1988) – source: Miramax Films

Hollywood is not the only city to leave a lasting mark on the world of cinema. Each country has contributed to the art form in different ways that have moved film into a whole course of study. Italians have made a thumbprint on film, whether it is Italians straight from Italy or Italian-Americans. But there is a theme that travels throughout a lot of Italian cinema, and that is the art of the dream. Let’s take a further look into why dreams have been used as a device in some of Italy’s most popular movies.

Italian History

While history, in general, is a huge passion of mine, I will spare everyone the details of giving an Italian history lesson. But as we all know, Italy is a rich culture that prides itself on its cuisine, artwork and fashion. But as film started up in the 20th century, Italy was going through a dark period. After being a newly unified country, it was swamped in corruption before the first World War broke out.

Italy went into the war as a divided country, with Fascist regimes on the rise. After Mussolini took hold of the country, Italy was in a full blown police state. People were impoverished and morale was low. By the end of the war, the neorealist movement was in full effect and depicted life in Italy for what it really was. And it was not great. Poverty and hard working conditions forced the country to try and find an outlet. And for a country so artistically inclined, the outlet started to take form in cinema.

8 1/2 (1963)

Sogno Italiano: The Art Of The Dream In Italian Film
8 1/2 (1963) – source: Cineriz

When talking about Italian film it would be impossible not to mention Federico Fellini. And in regards to the topic of dreams, 8 1/2 spares no time getting right into the theme. The first three minutes of the film are a dream sequence in which the main character, Guido, is stuck in trafficking and suffocating. He is able to free himself from his car and floats through the crowd, like a statue of the Virgin Mary during a procession. He floats into the clouds before he is dragged back to earth. Guido is a character loosely based off of Fellini himself. He is a film director who has ran out of inspiration and feels the immense pressure of everyone around him.

The film in its entirety is a classic, but the first three minutes are able to compile a whole narrative for the pressure that anyone in the film business must feel. All of the people in the other cars watch as Guido struggles for breath and tries to escape his car. The viewers of Guido juxtapose the viewers of a film; mere bystanders who watch and judge.

For 8 1/2, the subject of a dream is not a novelty, but it shows how dreams and cinema coincide. Reality and moments of fantasy are what make up life and film. Fellini conceived many of his films through an array of influences, the way that the character Guido does. It can be implied that only through dreaming do these many influences take form into a cohesive story. The most notable correlation between dreams and film come from a famous quote said by Fellini, calling movies “a dream we dream with our eyes open”.

Cinema Paradiso (1988)

Sogno Italiano: The Art Of The Dream In Italian Film
Cinema Paradiso (1988) – source: Miramax Films

I use a test on people to see if I can take them seriously as lovers of film. The test is whether or not they have seen Cinema Paradiso. If the answer is no, then I know I can’t take them seriously. This might be harsh, or even childish, but this film, in my opinion, is a must-see.

The bulk of the film takes place in a flashback of the main character, Salvatore’s, childhood in Sicily after World War II. Salvatore, whose nickname is Toto, lost his father in the war and spends a lot of his time at the local movie house. Alfredo, the projectionist, finds Toto to be irritating and mischievous and tries to drive him away, but Toto keeps coming back. They eventually become really good friends and Toto learns how to use the film projector.

The films become a parent to Toto and offer him an escape from the war-torn island. His dreams are the actual release of watching a film. Every time he watches a film he is able to see a different side of life, even though the films are being edited by a local parish priest. Films are better lessons than he is able to get from school. Toto stays at the cinema and eventually takes over the job from Alfredo when he is hurt in an accident. He goes from being a childhood viewer and parlays that into his teenage job, one which he takes very seriously.

It is through the power of cinema that Toto is able to dream of a life far from his own. But he makes this dream a reality. He grows up to become a filmmaker in Rome. Toto was one of the lucky ones who was able to make his dream a reality. In this film we see that dreams are not unattainable and are not mere figments of imagination.

Malena (2000)

Sogno Italiano: The Art Of The Dream In Italian Film
Malena (2000) – source: Miramax

There are certain characteristics for a quintessential coming-of-age film: an awkward situation, a crush, and strange parent behavior. Malena has all three, and has the backdrop of Sicily during World War II. The main character, Renato, gets his first bike and starts to ride around town. He falls in love with a woman named Malena, who lives on the outskirts of town and whose husband is a soldier at war.

Malena, played by Monica Bellucci, is strikingly beautiful and is envied by all the women in town. She lives a simple life, just taking care of her father and trying to find work around town. Renato becomes obsessed with her daily routines and follows her, until he notices that he is not the only person interested in her.

As she begins to become more ostracized from town because of her beauty, she resorts to working in the brothels where the German soldiers frequent. Renato follows her one night and passes out after seeing her with a soldier. His mother is convinced he is possessed by demons and has a priest try to perform an exorcism. Malena is ultimately forced to leave town right before her husband, who she thought was dead, shows up. Renato sends him a message to tell him that Malena fled. He finds her and they are reunited. A year passes before Renato sees Malena again. Out of all the women Renato ends up loving in his life, the only one that he remembers fondly is Malena.

Throughout the film Renato places himself in imaginary circumstances with Malena. He envisions they are like movie stars recreating an epic love scene. Renato’s boyish fantasies are relatable to anyone who has had a crush in their childhood. His dreams of Malena transport all audience members back to their youth and leave us with nostalgic feelings of our first loves.

Dreams in Italian film: Conclusion

Italian culture is sensual, romantic and nostalgic; and their films reflect that. To dream is to be creative and hopeful. Italian culture demands that we look behind to see what we have left, and look forward to see what we can become. While Italian film is diverse, it is the films that focus on the dreamers that catch my heart and remind me of the greatness of my culture.

Please follow and like us:

Italian music today (IT/EN)

Italian music is overwhelmingly known all over the world. But what kind of music do people from around the globe associate with Italian music? They (too) often associate it with classical music or authors from the past because those are the artists that made Italian music as famous outside the country as it is today.

Singers and authors who shaped the history of music in Italy, but are no longer searched for by the new audiences, go abroad to continue their career. There are plenty of examples: Al Bano, Toto Cotugno, and Pupo are still searching for fame and success and since the Italian audience has got over their music, they search for glory in Russia and eastern Europe, and others like them in Asia, South America, North America.

So this is what they export to other countries and Russians, Americans, Asians, and other people, think that this is what Italian music still sounds like, but it’s not their fault obviously, it’s actually the singers’. They just want to be famous and they don’t think that they should give up on their career, even after having a had a great one in their own country (and being elderly, let’s face it).

If you actually came to Italy, you would know that the singers mentioned above are no longer the reality, and that new and young singers are now taking the scene. Thank God, I might add! There is need for fresh and new music and this is what we should tell the world as Italians. It’s not always about the past, it’s about the future. It’s about giving the possibility to new generations to do something with their lives (this is relevant in all fields in Italy, mostly in the work-related one).

This is the reason why I have made a playlist containing songs by new artists and singers, songs that young people listen to today. I felt it was necessary because you want Italian music to listen to and I want to give you something fresh and real, not the same old, and often too stereotypical, music. So below you can listen to my playlist:

It contains songs by singers and bands, like ArisaNoemiNegramaroArticolo 31Subsonica, for example. Have you ever heard of any of them?

So I guess my point is that opera music or classical singers and authors are part of Italian music, but they do not represent it completely. For example, I think that Il Volo are great, but they export a kind of music that in Italy is listened to by a niche audience; their style is outdated. But then, they have concerts worldwide and dates go sold out because their music matches the idea or the visualisation that foreigners have of Italian music. They have huge success everywhere but Italy. That is something to think about.

Today rap or hip-hop music is really big in Italy, but did you know that? Did you know that we have always had a lot of Italian rappers? Probably not, because that doesn’t fit in the collective imagination about Italian music. In the playlist you will also find songs by Italian rappers, such as Fabri FibraJ-AxBaby K, etc.

The aim of this post is to get you to know other aspects of Italian music, to get you to know new singers and new songs. So hopefully this was useful to you.

What’s your take on this? What Italian singers/bands/artists are famous in your country?

Also, leave a comment below telling who is your favourite Italian artist! And as Cesare Cremonini would say, “share the love” and this post with your friends!

 


La musica italiana è estremamente conosciuta in tutto il mondo. Ma che tipo di musica le persone nel mondo associano alla musica italiana? (Troppo) spesso l’associano alla musica classica o autori del passato perché sono stati loro ad aver contribuito alla fama mondiale della musica italiana.

Cantanti e autori che hanno dato vita e forma alla musica italiana, ma che non sono più cercati dal nuovo pubblico, vanno all’estero per continuare le loro carriere. Ci sono molti esempi di questo: Al Bano, Toto Cotugno, Pupo ancora cercano fama e successo, ma siccome il pubblico italiano è andato oltre la loro musica, ne vuole di nuova, loro cercano la gloria in Russia, in Europa dell’est, e altri come loro in Asia e nel continente americano.

Gli abitanti di questi paesi pensano che questi cantanti rappresentino la musica italiana di oggi, ma non è colpa loro, sono indotti a pensare questo perché questi cantanti non si arrendono alla fine della loro carriera, non si vogliono arrendere nonostante abbiano fatto una grande fortuna nel loro paese (e siano ormai anziani, diciamolo).

Se veniste in Italia, vi accorgereste che i cantanti che ho appena menzionato non rappresentano più la realtà musicale, e che ci sono tanti nuovi e giovani cantanti alla ribalta. Per fortuna, aggiungo io! C’è bisogno di nuova musica e questo è quello che dovremmo comunicare al mondo da italiani. Non bisogna sempre soffermarci sul passato, per quanto meraviglioso possa essere stato, bisogna guardare al futuro. Si tratta di dare un’opportunità alle nuove generazione di fare qualcosa della loro vita (e questo è applicabile in tutti i campi in Italia, soprattutto in quello del lavoro).

Questo è il motivo per cui ho creato una playlist di canzoni italiane che contiene la musica degli artisti di oggi, le canzoni che il pubblico di oggi ascolta. Ho pensato fosse necessario visto che voi mi chiedete quale musica potete ascoltare e io, di conseguenza, voglio darvi una risposta vera, non le solite risposte vecchie e a volte stereotipate.

La playlist contiene canzoni di cantanti e gruppi, come ArisaNoemiNegramaroArticolo 31Subsonica. Avete mai sentito parlare anche solo di uno di questi artisti?

L’obiettivo di questo post è semplicemente mandare il messaggio che la musica italiana non è solo musica classica, opera e canzoni degli anni ’50. Tutto questo è una delle tante sfaccettature, non rappresenta il panorama musicale italiano nella sua totalità. Per esempio, penso che i ragazzi de Il Volo siano davvero bravi, ma in Italia sono ascoltati da un pubblico di nicchia, hanno uno stile datato (per non dire vecchio). Al contrario, sono molto apprezzati nel mondo e i loro concerti fanno sold out perché la loro musica combacia con l’idea che il mondo ha della musica italiana. Questi ragazzi hanno successo in tutto il mondo, tranne che in Italia. Questo è uno spunto di riflessione.

Oggi il rap e la cultura hip-hop vanno molto in Italia, lo sapevate? Sapevate che abbiamo sempre avuto molti rap italiani? Probabilmente no, perché non corrisponde all’immaginario collettivo sulla musica italiana. Nella playlist trovate anche canzoni di rap italiani come Fabri FibraJ-AxBaby-K, ecc.

Con questo post voglio farvi conoscere l’altra faccia della musica italiana, voglio farvi conoscere nuovi artisti e nuove canzoni.

Qual è la vostra opinione? Quali cantanti/gruppi/artisti italiani sono famosi nel vostro paese?

Un’altra cosa, lasciate un commento scrivendo qual è il vostro artista italiano preferito! E, come direbbe Cesare Cremoni, “share the love” e condividete questo post con i vostri amici!

Please follow and like us:

October 9th is the final day to make reservations: Four-Course Italian Meal

Saturday, October 14 | 12pm | Italia-America Bocce Club, 2210 Marconi Ave. 

$25 per person; $20 for MHM members | Click here for reservations or call (314) 361-9017(Register through October 9)

Indulge in a culinary tour of Italy with a four-course Italian meal featuring dishes from the various Italian regions represented in St. Louis. Jeanne Florini, professor of the Dietetic Technology program at St. Louis Community College–Florissant Valley, will explain the cultural and environmental influences on the regions’ foods. *Register through October 9.

Please follow and like us: